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A baseball life: Scully is auctioning gadgets from his 67-year profession – New Haven Register

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LOS ANGELES (AP) – Vin Scully sat outside and watched two sets of his golf clubs being loaded into a truck. He thought of afternoons spent at the Bel-Air Country Club or with President George H.W. Bush.

These left-handers had fired many shots in many rounds, some good, some bad. Traversing the fairways has been a way to relax and swap stories from the stadium over the years. Seeing them move surprised the 92-year-old Hall of Fame announcer.

"Wow, there is a chapter in my life that really hurts," Scully told The Associated Press, "but at my age and after a few physical problems, I knew I could never hold it again." I've heard a door close in my life. "

Scully had a bad fall at the end of his driveway in April when he was picking up the mail, breaking his nose and ribs, and suffering a concussion.

"It was a learning experience," he said. "I'm holding onto my wanderer."

  • FILE – In this photo taken on Sept. 19, 2016, Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame announcer Vin Scully puts on his headset before a baseball game between the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants takes place in Los Angeles. Scully picked fewer items from his personal collection of memorabilia up for auction on September 23rd
    FILE – In this photo taken on Sept. 19, 2016, Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame announcer Vin Scully puts on his headset before a baseball game between the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants takes place in Los Angeles. … more

    Photo: Mark J. Terrill, AP

Photo: Mark J. Terrill, AP

FILE – In this photo taken on Sept. 19, 2016, Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame announcer Vin Scully puts on his headset before a baseball game between the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants takes place in Los Angeles. Scully picked fewer items from his personal collection of memorabilia up for auction on September 23rd
FILE – In this photo taken on Sept. 19, 2016, Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame announcer Vin Scully puts on his headset before a baseball game between the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants takes place in Los Angeles. … more

Photo: Mark J. Terrill, AP

A baseball life: Scully is auctioning items from a 67-year career

However, he has chosen to let go in other ways. Retired broadcaster Los Angeles Dodgers selected items from its personal collection of memorabilia to be auctioned on September 23. Internet bidding begins Friday on Huntauctions.com.

The auction was originally scheduled for the July All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles, but went online when the game was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"It has special meaning to so many people," said David Hunt, owner of Hunt Auctions in Exton, Pennsylvania.

Bats, balls, baseball cards, plaques and trophies. World Series rings. The spiral-bound scorebook from his final season in 2016. They represent the physical remnants of his 67 years with the Dodgers from Brooklyn to Los Angeles.

"I'd much rather keep the memories," said Scully, the longest-serving single-team broadcaster in professional sport history.

Most of the 310 lots were kept behind glass doors in a trophy cabinet in Scully's Los Angeles home. Awards covered a wall in the room that visitors were dying to see.

"It's not just a collection of cold, inanimate objects," Scully said. "There are things that mean a lot to me, but now it's time for someone else to appreciate them."

Among Scully's favorites:

– 30 lots related to US presidents including the elder Bush, Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. There is a book on Theodore Roosevelt that he signed in 1910 and given to Scully's father, who worked in the President's New York law firm. "I've always wondered what kind of journey this book was making," Scully said. He and Bush played college baseball, Scully at Fordham and Bush at Yale. Years later, when Scully walked off the golf course, he said to him, "As long as you're in the White House, you can say anything about your baseball career, but remember we both went 0 for 3." Bush's answer? "He just howled," Scully said.

– A letter from Red Barber who recruited his redhead colleague to the Dodgers booth and looked after him. After losing his own father at the age of 4, Scully adored Barber. In his sophomore year, Scully proclaimed Willie Mays as the best player he had ever seen. From the air, Barber said to him: "Young man, you haven't been around long enough to talk about the best player you have ever seen." Scully remembered, "He'd make me a good announcer or be damned."

– Multiple plaques listing Scully as a finalist for National Sports Caster of the Year. "I put it up for humility to remind myself, 'Hey, I was in the race but I didn't make it," he said. Of course, he was the winner for many years.

– A "battered and injured" scrapbook compiled by his mother with newspaper clippings about his career from the 1950s. "She was a great red-haired woman with a great smile," he said.

– A worn brown leather sheet with its scorebooks. Inside are some of his favorite poems and texts recorded. "A member of the Bel-Air Country Club who worked in the leather industry did it for me," he said.

Scully and his wife Sandra plan to use a portion of the auction proceeds to help their five children, 16 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren with expenses that include schooling in the parish.

"It seemed like the time was right to help everyone," he said. "We're trying to do as much as we can before I hopefully get to heaven."

The auction is a way to avoid the possibility of future family disputes over keepsakes. "I didn't mean to make great kids feel bad," Scully said.

The remainder of the proceeds will be donated to UCLA for neuromuscular research. Scully said his wife had an illness-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the terminal disease that forced the great Yankees Lou Gehrig to retire when he was 36.

"It's ironic that she named something like this after Lou Gehrig," he said.

Four years after his retirement, Scully is content to stay close to home. His shady voice can still be heard at Dodger Stadium. Most recently, he tells a video for the birthday of the late Kobe Bryant. Scully recorded it in one take as seamlessly as he filmed stories behind the microphone for nearly 70 years.

"I can look back and enjoy it and not regret it," he said.

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